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Advertisement for Dole Hawaiian Pineapple Products

Description:

This advertisement for Dole Hawaiian Pineapple Products came from an unidentified magazine in 1945. The ad uses the central image of a street corner mailbox backed by dozens of letters to ask readers the question, “Can you pass a mail box with a clear conscience?” The ad downplays the company’s product for an overt appeal to the readers’ guilt.

Through this ad, Dole encouraged readers to send a V-mail messages to troops as often as possible, reminding them of the critical importance of mail to troop morale during wartime. It also personalizes the Dole experience by using an example of a Dole employee who writes home about the importance of getting mail.

V-mail service, was used in the U.S. from June 15, 1942 through April 1, 1945. Unlike regular mail, which traveled by ship and could take up to a month to reach its destination, V-mail traveled by air and cut down transport time to 12 days or less.

Advertisement text:

Headline

Can you pass a mail box with a clear conscience?

Main text:

Just suppose that instead of this mail box you came face-to-face with the boy in uniform you’ve neglected to write! . . . After all, writing a letter is such a little thing to do . . . and yet to those in the Service it is the most important thing in the world. From the Southwest Pacific, a Dole employee who is now in the Service writes as follows—

"Mail is a great thing. It is a barometer on a ship. When we don’t have mail for long periods, the morale becomes very low. . . but just as soon as mail is brought aboard, the entire ship brightens and the change in atmosphere is certainly surprising."

Even if you have no one of your own in the Armed Forces, drop a cheery line to a neighbor’s son or daughter, a former business associate, or, perhaps, one of the servicemen you’ve entertained in your home. To speed your letters and to save valuable shipping space, use V-mail.

Date:
1945
Medium:
paper; ink (multicolor)
Dimensions:
Overall: 34.9 x 25.4cm (13 3/4 x 10in.)
Museum ID:
2004.2016.11
Place:
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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