Arago: First-Class & 34-cent Statue of Liberty

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First-Class & 34-cent Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty definitive stamp was issued in both First-class and 34-cent versions. The stamp, designed by Derry Noyes of Washington, DC, was based on a photograph by Paul Hardy of New York, New York. The Statue of Liberty, a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States, has become a symbol of freedom and democracy. Located in New York harbor, the statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886, and designated a National Monument on October 15, 1924.

The first First-class stamp was issued in Washington, DC, on December 15, 2000. The stamp was issued in a self-adhesive booklet of twenty, a self-adhesive vending book of twenty, a gummed coil of 3000, and a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) coil of 100. Avery Dennison printed 1.5 billion stamps in convertible booklets of twenty and 200 million stamps in vending booklets of twenty. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing produced 200 million stamps in water-activated coil of 3,000 and 1 billion stamps in self-adhesive coil of 100. All the stamps were printed in the gravure process.

The 34-cent stamp was issued in Washington, DC, on January 7, 2001, and New York, New York, on February 7, 2001. This stamp was issued in six formats: a convertible booklet of twenty (2.7 billion gravure stamps by Avery Dennison); a convertible booklet of ten (400 million gravure stamps by Avery Dennison); a vending booklet of 20 (800 million gravure stamps by Avery Dennison) ; a self-adhesive coil of 100 (8.8656 billion gravure stamps by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing); a water-activated coil of 10,000 (100 million gravure stamps by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing); and a water-activated coil of 3,000 (400 million gravure stamps by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing).

Reference:

Postal Bulletin (November 30, 2000)

Postal Bulletin (December 28, 2000)

Postal Bulletin (January 11, 2001)


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