Arago: 1987 Literary Arts Series: William Faulkner Issue

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1987 Literary Arts Series: William Faulkner Issue

William Faulkner (1897-1962), American novelist and short story writer, spent most of his life in Oxford, Mississippi. His work captured worldwide attention with its depiction of the Deep South. His intimate familiarity with the human condition—the courage, honor, hope, pride, compassion, pity, and sacrifice which have been the glory of man's past—reflects a timeless universality. Faulkner's imaginative power, the intensity of his style, his continuous experimentation with form, and the authority with which he spoke on the nature of man make him one of the few American writers viewed as great by critics and literary experts. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1949, and two Pulitzer Prizes—for A Fable (1955) and The Reivers (1963).

The Postal Service issued the William Faulkner stamp in 1987. Bradbury Thompson of Riverside, Connecticut, designed the stamp, which is based on a portrait by Murray L. Goldsborough.


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