Arago: Summer Olympics Issue

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Summer Olympics Issue

The US Postal Service issued five 29-cent Olympic Summer Games commemorative stamps in sheet format on June 11, 1992, in Baltimore, Maryland, in conjunction with the opening ceremonies of the US gymnastics championships at the Baltimore Arena. The stamps highlight five Olympic summer events — soccer, women's gymnastics, volleyball, boxing, and swimming.

The semi-jumbo commemoratives were available in panes of thirty-five, with descriptive copy on a tab adjacent to each sport's strip of stamps. This format was also used for the 1990 American Olympians commemorative stamps and the 1992 Olympic Winter Games commemorative stamps.

Designed by Richard Waldrep of Baltimore, Maryland, these were Mr. Waldrep's first designs for the Postal Service. Stamp Venturers, Inc., printed the stamps on the photogravure press.

Descriptive copy information includes:

The popularity of soccer in the US has grown tremendously in recent years, and the improved quality of play has enabled US teams to become more competitive than ever before in the world soccer arena.

Many believe that gymnastics may be the toughest of all Olympic Summer Games sports. The rigid competitive standards for the sport require that the gymnast be as agile as a ballerina, as quick as a sprinter is, and as strong as a weightlifter.

The US men's volleyball team went to the 1992 Olympic Summer Games in search of a third consecutive gold medal. This truly American sport began in Holyoke, Massachusetts, and gained global popularity during world wars I and II.

Cleverness, speed, defensive skills, and the ability to score points on one's opponent all outweigh the measure of how much physical punishment an athlete can absorb in the sport of boxing.

US men's and women's swimming teams have won a significant number of medals in Olympic Games competitions. American swimmers and divers are expected to be showcased again in the 1992 Olympic Summer Games at Barcelona, Spain.

Reference:

Postal Bulletin (June 11, 1992).


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