Arago: 29 & 32-cent Rose

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29 & 32-cent Rose

The United States Postal Service issued the 29-cent multicolored Rose definitive stamp (Scott 2490) on August 19, 1993, in Houston, Texas, as a pane of eighteen die-cut self-adhesive stamps. Strips, or coils, were also produced to facilitate machine-affixing of the stamps. The stamp depicts a red rose.

Stamp Venturers printed the red, green, and black self-adhesive stamp on a Champlain webfed gravure press. It was distributed in panes of eighteen, three stamps across and six down on the pane. Gravure printing cylinders of 360 subjects were used to print the stamps. One group of three cylinder numbers preceded by the letter ‘S’ appears on the peel-off selvage strip. The stamp has die-cut perforations.

The coil stamps were printed from gravure printing cylinders of 220 subjects. No cylinder numbers were printed on the coil stamps.

On June 2, 1995, USPS issued a 32-cent Rose definitive stamp (Scott 2492) with a pink rose instead of a red rose. The change in color resulted from the change in first-class rates from twenty-nine cents to thirty-two cents. It was sold in panes of twenty and included a “1995” year date in the lower left corner below the design. The coil version was sold in rolls of 5,000 and strips of twenty.

Stamp Venturers printed the pink, green, and black self-adhesive stamp on a Champlain webfed gravure press 1. It was distributed in panes of twenty stamps plus a label, three stamps across and seven down on the pane. Gravure printing cylinders of 360 subjects were used to print the stamps. One group of three cylinder numbers preceded by the letter ‘S’ appears on the peel-off selvage strip and on every 20th coil stamp. The stamps have die-cut perforations on two, three, or four sides.

On October 24, 1996, USPS issued a third version of the definitive rose stamp, a 32-cent Rose stamp (Scott 3049) with a yellow rose. It was issued in the convertible booklet pane of twenty. Then in December 1996 two new formats became available—a vending machine booklet of fifteen and a prefolded pane of thirty. The stamp incorporated a “1996” year date in the lower left corner below the design. The two new formats included a first for booklet stamps—one plate number single in each booklet.

Stamp Venturers printed the green, yellow, warm red, and black self-adhesive stamp was again. The pane of twenty was formatted three stamps across and seven down on the pane, with a label instead of the lower right stamp. Gravure printing cylinders of 315 subjects were used to print the stamps. One group of four gravure cylinder numbers preceded by the letter ‘S’ appears on the first horizontal peel-off selvage strip. The stamps have serpentine die cut 11 x 11 perforations on two, three, or four sides.

The pane of fifteen was formatted two stamps across and eight down with a label instead of the lower right stamp. Gravure printing cylinders of 384 subjects were used to print the stamps. One group of four gravure cylinder numbers preceded by the letter ‘S’ appears on the bottom left stamp on the five-stamp (bottom) pane. The stamps have serpentine die cut 11.25 x 11.75 perforations on two or three sides.

The pane of thirty was formatted two stamps across and fifteen down on the pane. Gravure printing cylinders of 360 subjects were used to print the stamps. One group of four gravure cylinder numbers preceded by the letter ‘S’ appears on the bottom right stamp. The stamps have serpentine die cut 11.25 x 11.75 perforations on two or three sides.

On August 1, 1997, USPS issued a 32-cent Rose definitive coil stamp (Scott 3054) with a yellow rose. The stamp incorporated a “1997” year date in the lower left corner below the design and “USPS 1997” is microprinted as part of the narrow stem that projects to the right from the main stem of the rose.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing produced the magenta, yellow, green, and black definitive on the Giori four-color offset three-color intaglio F press (801) and perforated 9.9 vertically using the Goebel die-cutter. The stamp was printed and distributed in coils of one hundred. Offset printing plates of 480 subjects were used. One group of four offset plate numbers is printed on every 24th stamp.

Roses had previously been depicted on a 1978 booklet pane (Scott 1737), 1981 se-tenant Flowers block of four (Scott 1876), 1982 International Peace Garden commemorative (Scott 2014), State Birds and Flowers pane (Scott 1962, 1967, 1984, and 1986), and the 25-cent Love stamp (Scott 2378) and 45-cent Love stamp (Scott 2379).

A rose is a flowering shrub (genus Rosa) as well as the flower of this shrub. There are more than a hundred species of wild roses, all native to the northern hemisphere and primarily from temperate regions. The species form a group of generally thorny shrubs or climbers, and sometimes trailing plants, reaching 6.5–16.5 feet tall.

The flowers typically have five petals, usually white or pink, in a few species yellow or red.

The Rose is the state flower of Iowa (Wild Prairie Rose, 1897), New York (Rose, 1955), and Oklahoma (Oklahoma Rose, 2004), and the official floral emblem of Georgia (Cherokee Rose, 1916) and North Dakota (Wild Prairie Rose, 1907).

References:

Linn’s U.S. Stamp Yearbook 1993

Linn’s U.S. Stamp Yearbook 1995

Linn’s U.S. Stamp Yearbook 1996

Linn’s U.S. Stamp Yearbook 1997

Scott 2005 Specialized Catalogue of U.S. Stamps and Covers

NETSTATE.com (http://www.netstate.com/states/tables/st_flowers.htm)


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